Archive for August, 2016

BARODA MICHIGAN – “placeMaking” a Great Community.

August 12, 2016

Econ of Place book cover10-year economic reinvention strategy profiled in Michigan Municipal League nationally distributed book

Today, “placeMaking”, the newest strategy for reinvention of economic troubled downtowns through creation of a new economy founded on higher density residential living, more pedestrian walkability and less dependence on the automobile, is the new elixir for past downtown decay.

While a national phenomenon, especially in Michigan this strategy is being promoted for big and small city economic renewal strategy.

Its founded on two economic philosophies, the first, that today’s smart young talent prefer a different residential pattern of development, one of higher density that supports compact social, entertainment and employment opportunities within reasonable “walkabily” (or biking) distance.

The second principle is that employers who want this young talent for their business will seek out and locate in these densely populated centers where needed talent reside.

Simply stated, business will move to talent rather than talent moving to business.

Evidence for this evolutionary demographic change is substantial.

US Census data document that central city population in metropolitan areas have grown more quickly than other forms of residential living environments.

Today, city planners promote “placeMaking” as the elixir for future economic sustainability by identification critical uniqueness of local economies and both public and private investment to create the higher density residential living environment and walkable social environment and employment venue.

Baroda is an example of the unique competitive advantage theory.

It was founded to collect surrounding farm production for transport, via interurban rail to the Benton Harbor/St. Joseph metro center prior to the advent of truck transport.

It reinvented itself in in 60’s & 70’s as southwest Michigan’s “tool & die” capital servicing the auto and appliance manufacturing industry.

Returning to its agricultural roots, in response to the demise of manufacturing, today Baroda serves as the center of southern Lake Michigan’s wine and craft brew agriculture crop production and mechanical equipment manufacturing.Baroda Michigan Municipal League Cover Article FNL  9

Baroda’s latest economic reinvention is told in the MML book Economic of Place – The Art of Creating Great Communities”, a case study of Village government investment and new business location and growth documenting “placeMaking” success.

 For me, it chronicles a 10-Years of personal history with a special community made up of a unique citizenry seeking a sustainable small town suburban economically viable walkable living environment.

I’m proud to serve as the planner, economic developer and advisor to Baroda in “placeMaking” a great community.

 

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Preparing Next Gen Economic Development Leadership

August 10, 2016

Purdue Northwest Graduates Northern Indiana’s first class of ED Civic Leaders

Picture1In 2006, I was asked to help establish an economic development educational program to be offered as an elective in the Purdue Northwest Masters of Business Administration degree program and teach its capstone class.

While consuming several years to gain academic approvals, the three classes, The Competitive Advantage of a Region, Economic and Social Analysis, and The Process of Economic Development were formulated into a free-standing certificate allowing both full-time MBA and non-credit student enrollment.

This certificate program fulfills an identified need in Northern Indiana – an educational opportunity for a wide-range of community leaders to gain knowledge about the role of economic development in their community.

The Process of Economic Development capstone class activity gives the student a “real life” experience analyzing a preselected community for the location of a new business including a formal presentation of community assets before a panel of representative decision makers of the business made up of the Mayor and several economic development practitioners.

Northern Indiana is truly blessed to have a cadre of upwardly mobile leaders who will undoubtedly serve as volunteer board members for economic development organizations whether they be government, chamber of commerce or nonprofit sponsored and guide their economic development efforts towards success.

This education program prepares students with knowledge of economic development agency operations but also duties and responsibilities of the agency directorship appointment.

This is a “first of its kind” program to train future volunteer economic development leaders in Northern Indiana, a model that surely will be followed by others.

 

 

INNOVATIVE COMMUNITY…are you one?

August 8, 2016

Smart PlacesTHE SMARTEST PLACES ON EARTH   Why Rustbelts are the Emerging Hot Spots of Global Innovation 

Antoine van Agtmael and Fred Bakker

2016 Public Affairs Perseus Books Club, New York

It’s every Mayor’s goal…an innovative community that surpasses social and economic threats producing social and economic prosperity.

There are 100’s of books telling how to do this…describing public, and yes, private programs to achieve this.

One of the newer contemporary suggestions – innovation – put forth by Antoine van Agtmael and Fred Baker in their book “The Smartest Places on Earth” add to the wealth of ideas and techniques for socio-economic sustainability.

They proffer that “brainsharring” for the new economy, the “reinventing of local economies by developing new products, technologies that will eventually transform daily life, is the solution to economic repurposing of our rust belt impacted communities and surrounding regions”.

Through visitation and personal interview among a select group of economically reinvented former “rust belt” global communities, they identified “keys” to successful economic reinvention.

Here are a few “takeaways” from reading:

PAST HISTORY IS UNDERSTOOD AND FUTURE REOCCURRENCE IS PREVENTABLE
Successful “brainsharing reinvention” begins when communities acknowledge the historic economic malaise and generate a strong sense of action to prevent reoccurrence – the “communitywide recognition that economic improvement action is necessary”.

AN ECONOMIC PATHWAY IS PRESENT AND UNDERSTANDABLE
Coupled with the attitude ‘it won’t happen again” is the notion of a new direction – “a pathway to economic revitalization that repurposes the local economy producing a sustainable future”; one that is also easily understandable to a wide spectrum of constituents”.

MULTIPLISTIC SUPPORT MAGINFIES SUCCESS
Brainsharing across public and private entities is a must and typically arranged, facilitated and mentored by a “connector”, one, or more, individuals who bring together, normally separate interest groups to collaborate and then serve as their “shepherd” leading them to a specific goal.

NARROWISM SUCCEEDS
While there are many pathways, concerted effort on 1 or 2 reinvention strategies leads to greater chance of success compared to expending a “little bit of effort on a wide variety of strategies”.

For those interested in economic reinvention of local economies, this book will stimulate some interesting thoughts about the “new economy philosophy” of economic development and job creation.

Economic reinvention comes with destruction and replacement of current socially accepted community thinking.

Maybe more important for action is the “continued fear that a significant economic down turn event can happen again and we can’t let that happen”.

It also shows that reinvention must happen regardless of its hard work and realistically, is bigger than our community alone…calling on us to cooperate on a larger regional scale.

An innovative community is one which welcomes technological destruction, shows a willingness to sponsor “brainsharing” for the purposes of producing new businesses creating new economy jobs and investment.

THE SOUTH SIDE – A Portrait of Chicago & American Segregation

August 6, 2016

 Natalie Y. MooreMoore book

South side reporter for local NPR member station.
2016 St. Martin Press, New York

Chicago is a city of neighborhoods…places of similarity…racial, religious, ethnic, socio-economic.

These places both connect and divide human contact, economic investment, political capital… they also foster racial, religious and ethnic diversity while perpetuating segregation.

Growing up a Chicago “sout-sider” means you’re different – not bad, nor deprived but different.

Natalie Moore captures this difference.

Being a black “sout-sider” she shares her life experience; a middle class black family upbringing from the Chatham racially divided neighborhood to racially integrated Beverly and Hyde Park/Englewood neighborhoods to the up and coming Bronzville neighborhood all while expertly describing how Chicago social, political and economic forces shape the neighborhood landscape and their socio-economic strictures.

Being a Chicago “sout-sider” and a seasoned city planner – economic developer I was anxious to read her book.

The book refreshed memories, and I can say…I saw it, I lived it…and personally experienced both the good and the bad of Chicago’s “sout-side”.

For the city planner, her book offers many insights into today quest for community “placeMaking”.

Socio-economic homogeneity draws together economic and political power useful for neighborhood sustainability while at the same time posing a barrier to outside capital infusion and citywide political influence.

Readers will be challenged with the question of whether a socio-economic concentrated enclave is better than multi-faceted interests for neighborhood sustainability and social and economic betterment?

This is a must read for city planners and others with interest in “placeMaking” the art of “creating great communities” built around vibrant neighborhoods were people want to live.